Blog: Humane meat

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What’s the best thing about working for Bon Appétit? Willamette University Executive Chef André Uribe has been asked that question a million times

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A farm visit offers firsthand knowledge of how supporting a sustainable food system means being more than just willing to pay a higher price.

Melissa Miller, executive chef at SAP, sits for an interview about Bon Appétit Management Company’s cage-free egg policy, then demonstrates how to cook a simple omelet. Directed by 4SP Films for the US chapter of World Society for Protection of Animals, the short video is intended to inspire other corporations to go cage-free in their egg purchasing.

As a company, we rely on third party certifications to assure ourselves and our guests that the commitments we make are meaningful and are being met. When I heard that Bon Appétit chefs at Johns Hopkins University had started sourcing Certified Humane chicken from Murray’s Chicken, I jumped at the chance to learn more about what the certification means for the well-being of the chickens, our health and the environment.

This Saturday, February 16, join thousands of “foodies,” “farmies,” and leaders in food and farming in watching the TEDxManhattan: Changing the Way We Eat conference. Bon Appétit is very honored that Maisie Greenawalt, our vice president of strategy, was selected to present. During the third session, Empower, which starts at 4pm EST, Maisie will speak frankly about “How the Humane Sausage Gets Made” — how a large corporation like Bon Appétit decides to tackle animal welfare issues, and what specific challenges we face in meeting our aggressive deadline of 2015 to end all purchases of pork raised without gestation crates.

Today — and not for the first time — Bon Appétit Management Company is making history in the food service industry. In a joint announcement with The Humane Society of the United States, we are vowing to stop serving all pork produced using the cruel and inhumane practice of gestation crates and all eggs, including “liquid” ones (those removed from their shells), from hens confined to battery cages by 2015.