Blog: Nutrition

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By Kristen Rasmussen, MS, RD For this month’s Well Being Challenge, we’re encouraging you to Get Closer to Your Food by making meals with seasonal ingredients from local producers. We’d love for you to show your commitment to the local food community by sharing your food pictures or comments about your local and seasonal food experiences on our Facebook page wall. Here’s a quick, tasty recipe to get you started.  Simple Sautéed Garlic Chard (or other greens) Serves 6-8

By Kristen Rasmussen, MS, RD For this month’s Well Being Challenge, we’re encouraging you to Get Closer to Your Food by making meals with seasonal ingredients from local producers. We’d love for you to show your commitment to the local food community by sharing your food pictures or comments about your local and seasonal food experiences on our Facebook page wall. Here’s a delicious farmers-market salad to get you started.  Arugula Salad with Fennel, Pear, & Shaved Parmesan Serves 4

By Kristen Rasmussen, MS, RD Help your body repair the damage caused by aging and the environment by eating antioxidants. Deeply colored fruits, vegetables, and other naturally colored foods are rich in a variety of micronutrients that act as antioxidants, so eat a rainbow to guarantee you’re getting enough. For this month’s Well Being Challenge, we’re encouraging you to eat a meal containing fruits, vegetables, and other naturally colored foods from three different color groups at least once a day. To show off your beautiful and healthy meal, post photos of meals containing at least three different color groups on our Facebook page wall. Here’s an easy, tasty recipe to get you started! Steamed Broccoli with Caramelized Onions & Pine Nuts

Mike Tabor, an activist-turned farmer, first realized the problems with the quality of food in our public school systems about 20 years ago. He has been working on farm to cafeteria legislation ever since, and started his own organic farm in Needmore, PA. He sells to Bon Appétit through our Farm to Fork Program.

At Bon Appétit, we’ve let the powerful union of simplicity, taste, and nutrition guide our menus for a long time. So we were pleased to see that yesterday the U.S. Department of Agriculture replaced its complicated Food Guide Pyramid with a new, elegantly simple “My Plate” graphic. This new icon boils down what many consumers felt were complicated scientific messages into a clear snapshot of what your dinner plate should look like for good nutrition: more than half your plate should be filled with vegetables and fruit, and the other half with grains (mostly whole) and protein.

Silky Sea Palms (seaweed) and California Kombu (kelp) This summer, Director of Specialty Culinary Programs Jim Dodge and longtime Bon Appétit friend and author Raghavan Iyer toured the country to help host Bon Appétit Management Company’s Vegan Chef Trainings. I joined the Northern California Training, held at eBay’s headquarters in San Jose. It was a fun and flavorful affair! It was especially exciting to see the variety of ingredients with which Bon Appétit chefs cook. Many, such as seaweed, house-made seitan, and nut butters, are less mainstream but nonetheless nutritious and delicious. In this post, I include two of my favorite recipes from the Training. Please enjoy and let us know what you think!